Specificity, to be specific

A quick glance at today’s forecast became a several minute event when I read the following:

ISOLATED THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED TODAY AND THIS EVENING OVER
ABOUT THE SOUTHWESTERN TWO THIRDS OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE...AND A FEW
OF THOSE STORMS COULD BECOME STRONG TO SEVERE...WITH GUSTY
WINDS...HAIL AND HEAVY DOWNPOURS.

It went on to say there was only a 30% chance of this developing.  And, from the statement above, it (apparently) will be centered in one particular area.

The problem is…I’m not sure where that one particular area is.

The problem is what turned a second’s glance into a multi-minute glare.”

The problem? The specificity of the advisory – that’s the problem.

“…the southwestern two thirds of middle Tennessee…” – where exactly IS that?

I know what part of middle Tennessee is included in the southwestern designation – but what’s up with the “two thirds”?

Specificity in forecasting and weather advisory is a good thing – it can provide fast, easy information that says YES this is for your area, or NO it’s not.

But…sometimes specificity can muddy the clarity of the matter.

If you’re in the southwestern two thirds of middle Tennessee…heads up.  If you’re in the remaining southwestern 1/3 (and I assume you know who you are)…no worries.

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